Our managing editor Chelene Knight spoke with Alicia Elliott about what it’s like being an Indigenous writer in the CanLit world, and her thoughts on authenticity when telling an experience that isn’t your own.

Reading Room

I’ve heard that when you see someone you love your pupils get bigger, as if your eyes themselves want to swallow them up and trap them inside. 

Abattoirs, Abortuaries, and America (HOO-RAH)

Bleach and Beer-Batters, Batman!

Camaro . . . Catchphrases . . . Catachresis . . .

Donkey-sauce; Donkey-sauce; Donkey-sauce

Our 2017 Short Forms Contest Honourable Mention.

They drove me for miles until the ground was a table of white. We passed a fox licking itself with such ferocity if we were ever to turn back I swear, its hide’d been bloody.

Low dirt path parts Loch Awe as a helix unbinding.
We walk like thistled mutants to Kilchurn ruins.

Currently on Newsstands

  • Room Vol 40.1: Food
    Room 40.1, Food
    Edited by Rose Morris, Kayi Wong

    In this issue:

    Sarah Beck, Ashwini Bhasi, Kat Cameron, Lucas Crawford, Dora Dueck, Marilyn Dumont, Rebecca Fishow, Veronica Fredericks, Rachel Jansen, Jane Kirby, Alexis von Konigslow, Lee Lai, Tess Liem, Alice Lowe, Tanis MacDonald , sab meynert, Silvia Pikal, Marika Prokosh, Keyu Song, Sylvia Symons, Ivy Tang, Carol Wainio, Kayi Wong, Catriona Wright, Nicole Xu

    .

Interview Room

Ruth Ozeki

Ruth Ozeki received a Kiriyama Prize for her first novel, My Year of Meats (1998), an American Book Award for All Over Creation (2003), and the L.A. Times Book Prize for A Tale for the Time Being (2013), which was also shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize. In her novels, the writer explores subjects such as media representation, genetically modified crops, sexism, bullying, and suicide, but always with her signature wit and warmth. In the following conversation with Room's Kayi Wong, Ozeki discusses how she went from making videos in high school, to directing corporate-sponsored Japanese TV programs, to juggling the paradoxical relationship between writing and Zen Buddhism.

Jael Richardson is the award-winning author of The Stone Thrower: A Daughter's Lessons, a Father's Life, playwright of my upside down black face, and was the writer-in-residence at the Toronto district school board in 2013. Richardson is also currently a book contributor for CBC's q, and the founder and artistic director of the FOLD, the Festival of Literary Diversity, which commenced for the second time this week in Brampton, Ontario.

Jillian Christmas, artistic director of the Verses Festival of Words, speaks with poet, artist and co-founder of Black Lives Matter – Vancouver, Cicely-Belle Blain.

Reviews

By recounting the unresolved hurt of her past, and facing the uncertainty of her future, Harrison—who was diagnosed with advanced metastatic breast cancer in 2013—has found one way to reclaim power from the “bogeyman” that is her illness.

Powerful in its brevity, Songs of Exile explores displacement, intimacy, and fear in short, chaotic bursts.

Oscar of Between is a dynamic work of startling insight.

Room with a View

Deep Salt Water: Month Nine

Read the final installment in the captivating and thought-provoking Deep Salt Water series, an interdisciplinary collaboration among four artists—author Marianne Apostolides, collage artist Catherine Mellinger, photographer Melanie Gordon, and composer Paul Swoger-Ruston—based on the forthcoming book by Apostolides of the same title.

Posted April 21

Room's 2017 Short Forms Contest Winners

Room Magazine is pleased to announce the winners of our inaugural Short Forms Contest, as chosen by judge Jen Sookfong Lee.